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X-Files Fans May Disagree - Salvador Dali in a lawn chair.
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lost_angel
lost_angel
X-Files Fans May Disagree
Since the SciFi Channel has had The X-Files running fairly continuously and zordac really likes running it in the background, I have been reminded of how much I dislike the show.

I don't dislike it because of the subject matter. The plots are fairly interesting, the characters are agreeable and fairly developed, and the life of the show long enough to have created over-arching plots to mesh with the episodic ones.

The linking word here is...fair or fairly. It is only so-so, mediocre, unimpressive, unremarkable. None of The X-Files episodes are highly interesting. None of them taught me anything new or gave me a new insight or perspective of something that had caught my attention before.

The only thing cool about it was how the series tries to combine the quick, action-filled, and accurate style of a crime/law-enforcement drama with the eerie, unnerving, and unusual themes of science fiction and paranormal activity.

However, it didn't even do that successfully. Whereas crime dramas tend to wrap themselves up nicely with an acceptable, reasonable answer, leaving no loose ends or unanswered questions, The X-Files usually (and there are a few episodes which are exceptions) denied me of the satisfaction of the perpetrator being caught, the source of the anomaly being explained. So when the show was over, I was no better off than when I started...there was a mystery, unsolved and unexplained and annoying me.

True mysteries are never solved...elsewise they stop being mysteries. This is addressed by Tim O'Brien's novel In the Lake of the Woods), a most infuriating, yet interesting book.

However, when it comes to episodic television, I want something that resolves itself at the end, that doesn't leave that lingering, uncomfortable feeling of dissatisfaction with the story. There are so many real life mysteries (sometimes dealing with the same subject matter) that I don't need to waste my time on a show that doesn't provide me with something/anything at the end. I really like sci-fi and sorta like crime drama if it's well-done, but I don't like The X-Files.

I suppose it all goes back to only liking shows that teach me something. That doesn't mean all I like are documentaries. What a show or book teaches me can simply be a new understanding of characters and plots that I'd not thought of before. You might say that I want my shows and books to do my thinking for me. You might be right. I'd rather do my own thinking and extrapolation about something else other than television.

mood: irritated irritated
music: The Muppet Show Theme

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Comments
eddiecoyote From: eddiecoyote Date: November 29th, 2002 08:27 pm (UTC) (link)

20 Questions

I like X-Files, but not as much as Twin Peaks.

But that is not the reason for the post. I looked for people who lived in Oxford, Mississippi. I myself am living in Eugene, Oregon for three years now. Long story, including marines, Hi, Tx, Ca, Tn, Fl, and more states. But I graduated from Grenada in 1989 but sadly I cannot remember Oxford all that well from the days I played hooky from school and made the road trip there.

You see, my kin folk still live in Arkansas and Mississippi (sister is in Grenada) and she has two nephews and one of them I've never seen. I have no telling how many more years in college completing a BS and then graduate school and I feel that I am missing out on my their lives. So I am contemplating moving to Oxford and going to Ole Miss. Yet Eugene is a very hip little town, with great concerts (Ani Difranco to Rob Zombie to jazz clubs) to symphony to lots and lots of coffee shops to the mountains and the great Pacific Northwest. How does Oxford compare to all of this? What is the intellectual community like there? Are there ample opportunities for writers and poets? Are ther coffee shops aplenty? There are no less than 7 within a 1/2 mile of me now. What of the political environment? Is there an environmental presence there? What of Holly Springs national forest... is it all just boat docks and squared off camping, or can a person hike out away from the road and "get lost" from society with nothing but a tent and a compass? I'm sure it doesn't compare to the large wilderness areas in Oregon, but are there places that are "off the beaten path" out there?

Okay... have a great day!
lost_angel From: lost_angel Date: December 11th, 2002 03:24 pm (UTC) (link)

Re: 20 Questions

I saw your post a little while ago and curbed my inclination to respond because I knew that my feelings would tend toward a negative cast rather than displaying a objective review of life in Oxford. I'll try now instead after I've had more time to think on it.

Yet Eugene is a very hip little town, with great concerts (Ani Difranco to Rob Zombie to jazz clubs) to symphony to lots and lots of coffee shops to the mountains and the great Pacific Northwest.

The university sponsors several bands each year to play open concerts as well as closed, ticket-based concerts. However, the band selection is tailored to the expected tastes of the student body, so sometimes we get lesser known bands like Candlebox and Cowboy Mouth and Bonnie Rideout to bigger names like Adam Sandler and Lenny Kravitz. The local bar scene sometimes carries interesting, if not big, performers; and I'm sometimes a fan of the local, smaller scene bands anyway. I would sacrifice a small child to get a jazz club here, but mostly we have just bars/pubs and coffee shops.

What is the intellectual community like there?

When you say an intellectual community, I'm not sure what you're looking for. There are people here who are intelligent conversationalists, determined and outspoken activists and quiet analytical types. They do exist here. However, just like anywhere, it's all a matter of who you hang out with.

Are there ample opportunities for writers and poets?

The opportunities for writing here are no greater or less than opportunities elsewhere. Are you looking for recognition or lifestyle? Whichever, this is where I'd merge the idea of an intellectual community with writing opportunities. There is a strong network of writers in Oxford whether university affiliated, student-led, or simply local writers who have made their life in Oxford's atmosphere. Most of the bookstores love to stock the work of resident writers or natives who've moved away. For those who haven't published or haven't published much, there places like "Off-Square Books" (the counterpart to Square Books) and "Thacker Mountain Radio" who host and often air poetry readings, essay contests, and public discussions.

Are ther coffee shops aplenty? There are no less than 7 within a 1/2 mile of me now.

There aren't many coffee shops, but the ones we do have are rather nice with sofas, patios and internet connections. Some are connected to bookstores, others are, or claim to be, European bistro-style. We can't compete with ground zero of StarBucks in the Pacific Northwest, but it's really all a matter of what you think of things. Coffee shops are better with good company or a good book and those you'll find in abundance here.

What of the political environment?

I'm not even registered to vote here, yet. I need to do that. You'll have to ask someone else.

Is there an environmental presence there? What of Holly Springs national forest... is it all just boat docks and squared off camping, or can a person hike out away from the road and "get lost" from society with nothing but a tent and a compass? I'm sure it doesn't compare to the large wilderness areas in Oregon, but are there places that are "off the beaten path" out there?

I've never been to Holly Springs National Forest. I'm actually a Southern Mississippi girl who's only transplanted herself the past few years. I know that there are several places to go camp and not in the weekend biker sense but the backpack and a bologna sandwich kind. I know of many many nights my friends and I spent overnight with a campfire on a remote part of Sardis Lake.

I know I haven't answered all of your questions, only the ones I knew something about. My main comment is that a place is what you make of it. This town is half local, half transient. You find people you like and don't like everyday, often in equal amounts. If there's something here that you want, like a community of writers or people to start your own band with, you'll find people who will be supportive and open to that movement. Either way, if you move here for your family and yourself, what the town is like shouldn't be the big deciding factor. :)
2 Voices in a Chorus | Lift Your Voice Aloft